Tag Archives: non-dairy

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary

10 Oct

As part of my end of the season bounty, I have a big pile of slowly ripening cherry tomatoes.  At the peak of the cherry tomato season, we’d easily polish off a bowl in an afternoon just as a wander-by snack.  They were delicious eaten that way, but now that it’s the end of the season, they are a little more sour and less popular.  And at this stage, the time between “almost ripe” and “super ripe” is pretty short.  So, to boost the sweetness and encourage consumption, I decided to roast the tomatoes with a few of our favorite things and serve it up as a side.  And. It. Was. Awesome.

Unless you are my son, who says that the smell of rosemary can ruin a life.  And of course, he is wrong.

This dish could not be easier.  Cut up a bunch of stuff, throw it in a covered casserole, put it in the oven, stir and serve.  It would be excellent served with pork, chicken, turkey, or wild game.  It is very versatile and packed with flavor.  If you were cooking for a crowd, it would be easy to double – just increase the cooking time until the potatoes are tender.  So easy, so delicious.  You should make some.

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary
Serves: 6

 

1 lb. red potatoes, cut into big chunks
½ lb. cherry tomatoes, halved
1 shallot, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 T. olive oil
1 t. rosemary, minced
Kosher salt and Freshly ground black pepper
½ c. kalamata olives, halved

 

Preheat oven to 350° F.

In a casserole dish combine potatoes through rosemary and season with salt and pepper.  Cover and bake for 50 minutes.  Remove from oven, stir in kalamata olives and set aside for 5-10 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper if needed, and serve.

 

Estimated Calories:  123 cal/serving

Print it:  Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary

 

Bourbon Caramel Green Tomato Pie

9 Oct

Give me a few ingredients Lynne Rossetto Kasper-style and I can make something that lands somewhere between edible and tasty, as long as we’re not talking sweets.  Baking does not come easily to me, and it took me a long time before the successes outweighed the failures.  I’ve looked to others for advice and have found the following greatly increase my chance of success:

1. Buy store-bought pie crust (Betty and Connie)
2. When making apple pie, use half white sugar and half brown sugar (Grandma Muder)
3. Put some bourbon in it (my mom, obviously)

Putting all three into play resulted in my go-to pie recipe, Caramel Apple Pie, which I loved so much I renamed it LOVE POTION NO. 9.  If you have an abundance of apples or want to make someone fall in love with you*, I’d highly recommend it.  Last year, thanks to the prolific apple tree in my parents yard, I DID have an abundance of apples.  This year was not an apple producing year, however, so I thought that LOVE POTION TESTING would be out until my mom handed me a big bag of green tomatoes and mentioned Green Tomato Pie.  Two seconds with Google told me that this Southern specialty might be the answer I was looking for to use up the green tomatoes and continue my scientific study.

Although technically, green tomatoes can count as any unripened tomato, this is the best time of year to use them in this way.  Earlier in the year, while the days and nights are still warm, tomatoes will do their best to ripen while on the vine.  Once a frost hits though, the chances that they will sweetly ripen on the vine are pretty slim.  It’s at this point that you can try to force them to ripen (best bet here is to leave them in a paper bag and check on them once in awhile to see if any are ready) or to embrace the green.  The tomatoes force ripened are still better than the tomatoes you’ll find in a mid-winter Midwestern grocery store, but they lack the flavor and sweetness of a summer-ripened counterpart.  My suggestion is to do a little bit of both, and with 2 lbs. of the green tomatoes, make yourself this pie.

I was apprehensive about what a tomato would taste like when used in place of apples in a pie, but once I got over the thought of it, the flavor and texture proved to be awesome.  I read that a few people said “you’ll never know it’s not apple!”, and I think that might be a bit optimistic.  While the color and taste are not easily identifiable, I would not say that they are an apple dead-ringer.  However, they were much sweeter and tastier than I’d expected, and all my other tasters agreed, helping to polish off this pie in two days flat.

Bourbon Caramel Green Tomato Pie
Serves: 12

Green Tomato Mixture
2 lb. green tomatoes
1 T. fresh lemon juice
1 t. ground cinnamon
1/4 t. Kosher salt
1/3 c. all-purpose flour
2 T. white sugar

Caramel Sauce
3 T. water
1 T. whiskey or bourbon
3/4 t. vanilla extract
3/4 c. sugar
3/4 c. brown sugar
1/3 c. water
4 T. non-dairy butter

Pie Stuff
2 prepared pie crusts (non-dairy)
1 T. sugar

Preheat oven to 400° F. Remove prepared pie crusts from refrigerator and let sit at room temperature.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Drop in the tomatoes and boil for about 3-5 minutes or until the skins split.  Remove from water and cool.  When cool enough to handle, remove as much skin from the tomatoes as possible.  Cut off the stem end, quarter the tomatoes, and slice thinly.  Place sliced tomatoes on paper towels and pat to remove excess liquid.  Place tomatoes in a large bowl and add lemon juice, cinnamon, salt, flour and sugar. Set aside.

In a small bowl, combine the first three ingredients for the caramel sauce and set aside.

In a heavy saucepan, whisk together the sugar, brown sugar, and 1/3 cup water. Set over medium-high heat and cook for about five minutes. Remove from pan and whisk in the butter.  Add the whiskey mixture and stir until everything is well mixed and smooth.  Pour over tomato mixture and stir to combine.

Transfer 1 dough round to a deep pie pan. Unfold and ease into pan, patting it into the pan. Pour tomato mixture into the pie shell. Unfold the second dough round and place over the top. Press the sides together to make a tight seal around the outside edges, and then cut 6-8 slits on the top of the pie. Sprinkle with remaining sugar.

Bake until the crust is golden, for about an hour. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool for 1-1/2 hours before serving.

Estimated Calories:  267 cal/serving

Print it: Bourbon Caramel Green Tomato Pie

Notes:
– This is a saucy pie and while baking it can easily bubble over.  I’d highly recommend placing a baking sheet underneath the pie while baking to catch any saucy drips.
– Even with the store-bought crust, I still had trouble when rolling it out.  So, Sophie and I made a few decorative patches for the crust in the form of flowers and vines to seal up the holes left behind by my poor rolling skills.  I liked the look so much, I think I’ll do it again.  It took very little time and made the pie look extra FANCY.
– The first time I made the pie I used whiskey and the second time I used bourbon. My taste buds are not finely tuned enough to catch the difference when used in this recipe.  I think either one is just fine.
– Not all store-bought pie crust is non-dairy, so be sure to check the ingredients if non-dairy is important to your family.

*never actual proven, but  I love data and look forward to your research.

Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup

7 Sep

Cooler days and school back in session means that the crockpot has returned to it’s semi-permanent position on my kitchen countertop.  Hungry for some flavorful, slow-cooked food and eager to have food ready with little effort, I started searching around for some new recipes to try in the crockpot.  I spotted a Tomato Basil Parmesan Soup on Pinterest that looked mighty tasty, the only problem of course, all that dairy.  Looking through the ingredients, I figured that it wouldn’t be very hard to substitute the dairy for non-dairy counterparts, and while I was at it I decided to reduce the calories from the original version.  With all new recipes, it feels like a real crapshoot whether anyone will eat it, let alone enjoy it.

This recipe?  Jackpot.  Jackpot in the Crockpot.

Creamy and slightly cheesy, the base of this soup tastes a tiny bit like the sauce in Chef Boyardee’s canned pasta, which normally would not make it a ringing endorsement in my book.  HOWEVER, the kids totally loved it.  And the more I had, the more I loved it too.  Slightly rich, hearty, and low in calories, this soup might be one of our new favorite things.

After replacing the dairy ingredients in the original recipe (butter, parmesan, half and half) with non-dairy counter parts (non-dairy butter, Daiya mozzarella, soy cream), I was worried that the resulting soup would not be thick and creamy enough.  To make sure that the soup was not too thin, I added ingredients in two batches, pureeing the first half to create a thicker base.  The resulting flavor and texture was terrific, helped to thicken up the soup, and allowed me to reduce some of the fat and calorie-laden ingredients (this recipe is about 35% lower in calories than the original).  This recipe makes a pretty big batch of soup, which worked out great here because it has been requested for dinner and lunch several times.  I’m not sure if it will freeze well, and this time, I won’t even have the chance to try.

Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup
Serving size: 1 c.
Serves: 11

2 (14 oz) cans diced tomatoes, divided
1-1/2 c. carrots, cut into bite-sized bits, divided
1 stalk celery, cut into chunks
1/4 c. onion, cut into big chunks
1 clove garlic
1/4 c. fresh herbs (mix of basil and oregano)
4 c. chicken broth
2 T. non-dairy margarine
1/4 c. flour
1 c. soy cream
1 can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
3/4 c. Daiya mozzerella
Salt and pepper to taste

Add one can tomatoes, half the carrots, celery, onion, garlic, herbs, and chicken broth to a crockpot.  Cook on low for 5 hours.  After 5 hours, use a hand blender to puree the soup until no chunks remain.

In a skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add flour and cook for about 5 minutes.  Add cream and stir until the flour mixture breaks up into the liquid and becomes a thick sauce.  Add 1 c. of soup from the crockpot, stirring until well-combined.  Add another cup of soup from the crockpot if any doughy chunks remain.  When everything has been combined and the sauce has thickened, add to the crockpot and stir.  Add remaining tomatoes, carrots, cannellini beans, and mozzerella, then stir to combine.  Cover and cook for an additional hour.

Serve.

 

Estimated calories:  143 cal/serving

Print it: Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup

Notes:
– If you would like to replace my non-dairy replacements with dairy versions, I’d recommend using butter, shredded part-skim mozzerella, and half and half in the same amounts noted here.

Lamb Chops with Bourbon Cream Sauce and Mushrooms

17 Aug

In order to enjoy this recipe, you will need to love three things: 1) Lamb, 2) Bourbon, and 3) Mushrooms.  I know a lot of people who do not care for at least one of the items on this list, which is why I decided to make it just for myself.  As it turned out, it was for the best because I loved the sauce so much that I practically LICKED MY PLATE CLEAN.

Bourbon cream sauce = boozy magical elixir.

This recipe is easy and fast to make, with the added bonus that this is a one-pan meal.  When cooking lamb in a skillet, it’s important to know that it can get a little bit smoky in the kitchen.  So, I’d highly recommend making this dish on a night when you can throw open the windows or you run the risk of your kitchen looking like the CC Club, c. 1995.

Now, let’s talk for a minute about lamb chops.  There are all kinds of lamb chops.  My favorite is the rib chop, cut about an inch in thickness, Frenched (that means with the bone, cleaned up a bit so that there is little or no meat on the bone).  If you’re going to grill chops, some people like them a little thicker.  Others prefer to have the chops butterflied, with no handle-like bone.  Sometimes your butcher will give you options, sometimes they are already cut and you just have to decide that the cut available is the one you wanted.  This recipe is based on my favorite cut of chop, with about 3 oz. of meat on each one and that estimate is generous.  After cooking, each chop provides about 3-4 bites of lamb.  Really, tasty, awesome bites.

I served this dish with a side of farfalle and peas.  It would be excellent with anything that can soak up some sauce, like garlic mashed potatoes, buttered egg noodles, spaetzle, gnocchi, a big slab of Texas Toast.  Texas Toast probably doesn’t actually count as a side, but it sure would make a nice edible squeegee for your plate.

Lamb Chops with Bourbon Cream Sauce and Mushrooms
Serving size: 2 chops, sauce and mushrooms
Serves: 4

3-4 lbs lamb rib chops (approx. 8 chops, 3 oz. of meat/chop)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 T. olive oil
1/4 c. onion, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1 lb. button mushrooms, quartered
2/3 c. bourbon
1 c. stock (lamb, chicken, or beef)
1/4 c. soy creamer
1 T. fresh thyme leaves

Sprinkle the lamb chops with salt and pepper.  Set at room temperature for about 10 minutes.

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium high heat.  When oil is hot, add lamb chops.  Cook partially covered for about 4-5 minutes per side.  Remove chops from the pan, set on a plate and cover.

Reduce heat to medium-low and add onion and garlic, then cook for 1 minute.  Add mushrooms and cook for 4 minutes, stirring frequently.  Add bourbon and scrape the browned bits from the bottom of the pan.  Cook for a few minutes and add the stock.  Bring to a low simmer, adjusting the heat as needed.  Cook until the liquid has reduced and has thickened slightly.  Turn off the heat, and stir in creamer and thyme.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

Spoon mushrooms over chops and drizzle with sauce to serve.

Estimated calories:  595 cal/serving

Print it: Lamb Chops with Bourbon Cream Sauce and Mushrooms

Notes:
– In this recipe, dairy cream can be used instead of the non-dairy soy version used here
– Use your favorite bourbon or whiskey, this time I used Maker’s Mark and it gave the sauce great flavor

Zucchini Spaghetti with Kalamata Olives

11 Jul

A few weeks ago we visited one of our favorite restaurants, Russo’s, located in Marble Falls, Texas.  They have wonderful food and so many tasty options that it’s really hard to decide what to order.  I wanted a little bit of everything, and luckily my mom was willing to share the zucchini spaghetti that she’d ordered.  And by sharing, I mean one bite.  With that one bite, I’d decided that I’d found a new favorite.  Offered on Russo’s menu as an alternative to regular pasta, zucchini spaghetti provides the sauce delivery system that I love, while leaving behind the heaviness and unwanted calories of traditional pasta.  Bonus that it is nutritionally superior.  The trick to making it at home is having the right tool.

I love you, Lemon Zester.

Unless you have kickin’ knife skills, you’re going to need a tool to create all of the thin, even zucchini strips.  Unfortunately, I do not.  Pair that with my HUGE fear of using a mandoline (which seems like it might be a good tool for the job as well), I knew I needed another option.  I dug around in my utensil drawer and came up with the lemon zester.  Turns out, it was AWESOME for creating these strips.  Originally purchased for zest, I found that when I needed a dash of citrusy goodness, I preferred the microplane zester.  But, not wanting to discard the first one, I just kept it around.  And now I know why: zucchini spaghetti.

With the right tool in hand, prepping the zucchini spaghetti is easy.  Remove both ends of the zucchini and peel it, leaving behind some thin strips of the dark green peel if you’d like.  It does nothing for flavor, but does add a little bit of color contrast to the finished dish.  Holding the zucchini squash in one hand, scrape down one side with the multi-holed end of the zester to create long, thin strips.  Roll the zucchini in your hand, continuing around the zucchini until you eventually reach the seed center.  Discard the seed center, or save for another use.  Prepping the zucchini takes just a few minutes, and should be done right before cooking.

I think that the zucchini would work really well as a substitute for pasta in almost any recipe.  To cook the zucchini for use with any sauce, follow these basic steps:

  1. Heat olive oil in a pan over medium-high heat.
  2. When it’s hot, add the zucchini spaghetti and cook for two minutes.
  3. Sauce it up.

When considering the sauce for this recipe, I decided to take an idea from the dinner salad at Russo’s and combined Kalamata olives and orange zest.  It is a refreshing and tasty combination, and works really well with the zucchini spaghetti and some fresh basil.  I really loved this dish, and will definitely make it again as a side or a light lunch.

Zucchini Spaghetti with Kalamata Olives
Serving size: About 2/3 c.
Serves: 4

1/2 c. kalamata olives, halved
1/2 t. orange zest
2 T. olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
6 zucchini, ends cut off and peeled
2 T. white wine
1 T. fresh basil, cut into thin strips
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Mix together kalamata olives and orange zest, set aside.

Using a lemon zester or mandoline, cut zucchini into thin, long spaghetti-like strips.  Turn zucchini and continue to create strips until you reach the seed center.  Reserve the seed centers for another use.

In a skillet, heat olive oil over medium-high heat. When hot, add garlic and cook 1 minute.  Add zucchini and cook for 1 minute.  Add wine and basil, cook for 1 minute.  Remove from heat, stir in olive mixture, season with salt and pepper.  Divide between plates, and drizzle with any remaining sauce.

Estimated calories:  137 cal/serving

Print it: Zucchini Spaghetti with Kalamata Olives

Corn, Black Bean and Tomato Salad

29 Jun

The best thing about watching the kids play baseball four nights a week is that we’re outside watching baseball.  The worst thing is that we have a very small window to get home, ready for baseball, and eat dinner.  The eating dinner part of this is particularly tricky because it needs to be ready, quick to eat, and something everyone will eat because there’s no time for dilly-dallying at the dinner table while we have an EAT YOUR DINNER SHOWDOWN.  Last night I made a cold salad that I considered to be the ultimate meal – a base that everyone would enjoy, hidden protein, and lots of extra toppings to meet the needs of the picky palates at my table.  A cold salad featuring corn (everybody’s favorite), black beans, and tomatoes topped with a light honey-lime dressing.  The dressing is really nice, a little sweet and kind of tangy; it has the kid friendliness of French dressing with the added benefit of not being French dressing.  As I pulled out the bowls and encouraged everyone to DISH UP and ENJOY, I started to hear the words I dreaded most.

I hate black beans.
Are the tomatoes already mixed in?
Is there anything else?
Why isn’t this a pot pie?

Using the words that I knew their baseball coaches would later in the night, I told them to HUSTLE and GET GOING and NOT EVERYTHING IS A POT PIE (okay, no baseball coach is likely to say this, but they could because it is totally true).  I loved the dish, adding radishes and Sriracha to mine.  Martin said that it was edible, and liked the dressing even though the tomatoes contaminated the rest of his food.  And Sophie begged me to never to make it again.

Corn, Tomato and Black Bean Salad
Serves: 8
Serving Size: 1/2 c.

15.5 oz can black beans, drained and rinsed
12 oz bag corn, steamed, rinsed, and drained
2 roma tomatoes, diced
2 T. lime juice
2 T. olive oil
1 T. honey
Salt and pepper to taste

OPTIONAL ITEMS
Diced avocado
Chopped cilantro
Thinly sliced radishes
Sliced green onions
Jalapenos
Shredded lettuce
Tortillas
Corn chips
Salsa
Sriracha

In a large bowl, mix together black beans through salt and pepper.  Stir well to combine.  For best flavor, refrigerate for an hour before serving.

As is, this makes a nice side dish.  Add avocado, cilantro, radishes, green onions, or jalapenos if desired.  If serving as a main dish, serve in a bowl, over lettuce, in tortillas, or with corn chips.  Top with salsa or sriracha for extra kick.

Estimated Calories:  138 cal/serving

Print it: Corn, Tomato and Black Bean Salad

Churros Locos

22 Jun

Last summer while we were in Tucson, we visited Michoacan Taqueria/Raspados where we made two important discoveries.

#1 The Sonora Hot Dog, aka The Best Hot Dog on Earth

#2 Churros Locos

I’m not sure that I’ll ever be able to recreate that delicious hot dog, but I’ve taken the Churros Locos on as a personal challenge.  Living in Minnesota, there are two key ingredients that can be hard to find.  One I hauled back in my suitcase (Chamoy – a sweet, spicy, limey sauce, that is a bit like French dressing but kickier) and Churritos (sort of a like Cheetos but spicy and lime flavored).  In this recipe, the Chamoy is essential.  Without it, you are pretty much left with a veggie laden virgin Bloody Mary (also not bad, but not the same).  Most would argue that the Churritos are even more essential than the Chamoy.  I will agree that they give a crunchy goodness to the dish, but most of the time, I’d rather skip those calories and use them for something else later.  This dish is good with and without; add them if you’d like.  If you can’t find Churritos, I would recommend substituting Flamin’ Hot Cheetos, Crushed Doritos, or Chili Fritos.

THE ORIGINAL

MINNESOTA-STYLE

 

Churros Locos
Serves: 1

½ cucumber, quartered and cut into chunks
2 radishes, quartered and cut into chunks
4 baby carrots, cut into sticks
3 oz. Clamato
3 oz. Spicy V8
Salt and Pepper
2 T. Chamoy

 

Fill a large glass with as many cucumbers, radishes and carrots as you can.  In a separate glass, mix together Clamato, Spicy V8, salt and pepper.  Pour over vegetables.  Top with Chamoy.  Serve.

 

Estimated Calories:  88 cal/serving

Print it: Churros Locos

Notes:
– Want it a bit spicier?  Add some tabasco to the tomato juice mixture.
– Don’t like Clamato?  Skip it and double up on the Spicy V8.
– Too spicy for you?  Skip the Clamato and Spicy V8 and use regular V8 instead.

 

And if you’re in Tucson, track down a Sonora Hot Dog here:
Michoacan Taqueria/Raspados
3235 N. Flowing Wells Road
Tucson, AZ 85705

More info:
(520) 888-0421

Baby Banana Crumble

19 Jun

I’ve gotten into a rut when it comes to breakfast foods.  Every morning I sling one of the following, based on what my audience wants on any given day: toast, oatmeal, cereal, or eggs.  For the most part, the kids are pretty happy with this functional and fast breakfast style.  But me?  I’m bored.

This morning I tried something new, which honestly was pretty risky for a Tuesday (but sort of a Monday since the kids were gone yesterday).  The recipe is very simple – smashed banana with a crumble topping, and then baked.  The prep is very simple, and the hands-off baking time leaves me free to make lunch/prep bags/yell like a drill sergeant to GET GOING PUT ON PANTS WHERE ARE YOUR SOCKS BRUSH YOUR TEETH.  Basically, this recipe is perfect for those mornings when you want something hot and sweet but are short on time.  I made ours in individual ramekins, but if you were cooking for a crowd simply increase the recipe and place the whole thing in a baking dish that can contain the number of servings you need.

The critics say:

“This would be good with some maple syrup on top.” – Martin

“This would be better if it were toast with French dressing on it.” – Sophie

Baby Banana Crumble
Serving size: 1 serving
Serves: 1

1 ripe banana
1 T. flour
1 T. oatmeal
2 t. brown sugar
1 t. non-dairy margarine
Dash salt

Preheat oven to 350° F.

In a ramekin or small individual baking dish, smash a banana until it is creamy.  In a separate bowl, mix together remaining ingredients.  Spoon topping over banana and bake for 15 minutes.  Remove, let cool a bit, and serve.

Estimated calories:  210 cal/serving

Print it: Baby Banana Crumble

Notes:
– Feel free to substitute the non-dairy margarine for regular margarine or butter.
– I used frozen and thawed bananas in this recipe.  If you haven’t frozen super ripe bananas before, I’d highly recommend it.  They thaw quickly, and after snipping off one end, you can squeeze the mushy banana right out of the peel like squeezing a tube of toothpaste.  The banana is basically pre-mashed and ready to go.  If you don’t have a freezer filled with black, ripe bananas like I do, any really ripe banana will work in this recipe.

Honey Baked Chicken Tenders

19 Apr

When it comes to meat, there are very few options that Sophie is interested in eating.  Given a choice, she would eat primarily salami, pepperoni, sausage, summer sausage, and chicken nuggets.  All delicious in moderation, but not the healthiest choices on the block.  So when I suggested that we could make our own chicken nuggets, she said that I was sort of missing the point.  And while I was probably missing her point, my point was this – there has to be an option that would be both healthier AND something we’d all like to eat.

And of course, there is.

These chicken tenders were super easy to make, definitely healthier, and decidedly tastier than their processed-out-of-a-bag counterparts.  Without much prep and a little time in the oven, the chicken tenders were done in no time.  Made a bit crispy from an egg/flour coating and a little sweet with the addition of honey, they were delicious.  And everyone ate them – WITHOUT COMPLAINT.

Honey Baked Chicken Tenders
Serving size: 3 oz.
Serves: 4

Olive oil cooking spray
12 oz. chicken breast, cut into 16 pieces
1/2 c. all-purpose flour
1 t. kosher salt
1/2 t. garlic salt
10 turns freshly ground black pepper
1 egg
2 T. soy milk
1 T. honey

Preheat oven to 375° F.  Spray baking sheet with olive oil cooking spray.

In a bowl, combine flour, salt, garlic salt, and pepper.  Stir to combine.

In another bowl, mix together a lightly beaten egg, soy milk, and honey.   Add chicken and stir until all of the chicken is coated in the egg mixture.

Remove each piece of chicken and dredge it in the flour mixture.  Place on baking sheet so that none of the pieces touch.  Spray all of the chicken with olive oil cooking spray.

Bake in oven for 15 minutes, turning chicken every five minutes and spraying again with olive oil cooking spray.  When chicken is lightly browned and a bit crispy, remove from oven and serve.

Estimated calories:  234 cal/serving

Print it: Honey Baked Chicken Tenders

Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes

16 Apr

Considering that we’re just coming out of winter (today’s puny snowflakes notwithstanding), I really didn’t make very many traditional comfort foods this winter.  Sophie’s lack of interest in red meat has put a damper on the slow-roasted recipes I often make in the wintertime.  But yesterday, when it was sort of gloomy and gusty, it felt like the kind of day that called for something slow-roasted and aromatic in the oven.  Digging through the freezer, I uncovered a lamb shoulder roast, and set it out to thaw.  Channeling my inner Lynne Rossetto-Kasper, I whipped up a marinade using ingredients I had on hand and let the roast sit for a few hours in the refrigerator, flipping it every now and then while daydreaming about how awesome it was going to taste later.

And I was right.  This low effort meal was as delicious and flavorful as I had expected.  After letting the roast marinate for a few hours, I stuck it in the oven, left it alone, added sweet potatoes, left it alone again, and then served it up.  Everything was perfectly done and delicious.  To me.  However, if you were my kids, the review would have been slightly different.

Sophie’s Report: The lamb was fine.  For someone else to eat.
Martin’s Report: The lamb was really good, the potatoes were tasty, but he could have used a tweezers to remove every piece of rosemary from the plate.  Rosemary is INEDIBLE.

Unless you’re having them over for dinner, I’d highly recommend it.

Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes
Serving size: Lamb + Sweet Potatoes
Serves: 4

1/2 c. lamb stock (beef or vegetable stock if lamb stock not available)
2 T. olive oil
2 T. onion, minced
1 T. brown sugar
1 T. cider vinegar
1 T. Dijon mustard
1 t. dried rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 t. kosher salt
10 turns freshly ground black pepper
1-1/2 lbs shoulder of lamb roast
1-1/2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed

In a large ziptop bag mix together stock through salt and pepper.  Close the top, shake well to mix thoroughly.  Add lamb and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 325°F.  In a casserole dish, add the lamb and marinade.  Cover, and cook for 1 hour.  Add sweet potatoes, stir to mix in with the marinade, cover again and cook for an additional 30 minutes.  Remove from oven and let sit, covered, for 10 minutes.

Slice lamb across the grain and divide between plates.  Remove sweet potatoes from liquid and divide between plates.  Drizzle lamb and potatoes with cooked the juices from the pan.  Serve.

Estimated calories:  729 cal/serving

Print it: Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes