Tag Archives: mustard

Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes

16 Apr

Considering that we’re just coming out of winter (today’s puny snowflakes notwithstanding), I really didn’t make very many traditional comfort foods this winter.  Sophie’s lack of interest in red meat has put a damper on the slow-roasted recipes I often make in the wintertime.  But yesterday, when it was sort of gloomy and gusty, it felt like the kind of day that called for something slow-roasted and aromatic in the oven.  Digging through the freezer, I uncovered a lamb shoulder roast, and set it out to thaw.  Channeling my inner Lynne Rossetto-Kasper, I whipped up a marinade using ingredients I had on hand and let the roast sit for a few hours in the refrigerator, flipping it every now and then while daydreaming about how awesome it was going to taste later.

And I was right.  This low effort meal was as delicious and flavorful as I had expected.  After letting the roast marinate for a few hours, I stuck it in the oven, left it alone, added sweet potatoes, left it alone again, and then served it up.  Everything was perfectly done and delicious.  To me.  However, if you were my kids, the review would have been slightly different.

Sophie’s Report: The lamb was fine.  For someone else to eat.
Martin’s Report: The lamb was really good, the potatoes were tasty, but he could have used a tweezers to remove every piece of rosemary from the plate.  Rosemary is INEDIBLE.

Unless you’re having them over for dinner, I’d highly recommend it.

Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes
Serving size: Lamb + Sweet Potatoes
Serves: 4

1/2 c. lamb stock (beef or vegetable stock if lamb stock not available)
2 T. olive oil
2 T. onion, minced
1 T. brown sugar
1 T. cider vinegar
1 T. Dijon mustard
1 t. dried rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 t. kosher salt
10 turns freshly ground black pepper
1-1/2 lbs shoulder of lamb roast
1-1/2 lbs sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed

In a large ziptop bag mix together stock through salt and pepper.  Close the top, shake well to mix thoroughly.  Add lamb and refrigerate for 4 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 325°F.  In a casserole dish, add the lamb and marinade.  Cover, and cook for 1 hour.  Add sweet potatoes, stir to mix in with the marinade, cover again and cook for an additional 30 minutes.  Remove from oven and let sit, covered, for 10 minutes.

Slice lamb across the grain and divide between plates.  Remove sweet potatoes from liquid and divide between plates.  Drizzle lamb and potatoes with cooked the juices from the pan.  Serve.

Estimated calories:  729 cal/serving

Print it: Roasted Lamb with Sweet Potatoes


Advertisements

Rustic Squash Soup with Mustard Goat Cheese Crostini

8 Nov

A few years ago I went through a Squash Soup phase that was so prolific that it has taken me that long to want to eat it again.  Although it has taken awhile, I’m glad that my hunger for it is back because it is one of my favorite fall foods.  Squash soup is such a great way make the transition from summer produce into fall foods – it is healthy, hearty but low in calories, and full of vegetable goodness.  While I love a good soup, I also love feeling like I’m eating a lot at lunch.  Sometimes if I ONLY have soup with nothing else, I find myself snacking practically before I’m done doing the dishes.

Today I balanced the healthy soup with a side of crunchy baguette topped with the creamy goodness of goat cheese.  Not wanting to blow a bunch of calories with too much bread OR cheese, I mixed the goat cheese with mustard to give it a boost of flavor, and spread it on the bread.  After a light toasting, the result was a perfect complement to the slightly chunky soup.

Rustic Squash Soup with Mustard Goat Cheese Crostini
Serves: 4
Serving Size: 1 c. soup, quarter baguette

SOUP
1 T. olive oil
1/2 onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, chopped
2 c. chicken stock
3 c. butternut squash, roasted and slightly mashed
2 T. fat-free sour cream
Salt and pepper to taste

CROSTINI
1 small baguette (approx. 7-8 oz.)
2 oz. goat cheese
2 T. dijon mustard
2 T. water
1 t. chives, chopped

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

In a soup pot, heat oil over medium heat.  Add onions and garlic, cook until transluscent.  Add chicken stock and squash.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat and cook on low for 10 minutes.  Using a hand blender, puree slightly so that it thickens but is not yet smooth.  Add sour cream and stir until well combined.

While the soup is cooking, cut the baguette lengthwise and into quarters, for a total of eight pieces.  In a small bowl, mix together the goat cheese, mustard, water and chives until smooth.  Spread about a teaspoon of the goat cheese mixture onto each baguette.  Place in oven and heat for 5 minutes.

Serve soup with two crostini.

Estimated Calories:  285 cal/serving

Print it: Rustic Squash Soup with Mustard Goat Cheese Crostini

Notes:
– Since Sophie swears she hates squash, I decided not to bother making this recipe non-dairy.  In this recipe I used fat-free sour cream, but I’ve also used dairy-free sour cream with great results (adds about 15 calories per serving).
– You can use any kind of squash you like, I just happen to like the flavor and texture of butternut.  A single butternut squash contains about 3 c. worth of squash, but a little more or less won’t make much of a difference.
– If you choose to just make the soup and omit the crostini, one cup of soup is only 110 calories per serving.
– When I made this soup, I had already roasted the squash.  If you haven’t, and you don’t know just what to do, see Related Recipe below.  Super easy.

Related Recipe: Roasting a Butternut Squash
– Preheat oven to 400 degrees F
– Cut the squash in half lengthwise, scoop out all of the seeds and guts.
– Place the squash open side down on a baking sheet and bake until tender, usually around 45-60 minutes.  You’ll know it is done when you can poke it with a fork or knife.
– Remove from oven and flip open side up to cool for about 30 minutes.
– Scoop out all of the insides and either smash with a fork or puree until it reaches desired consistency.
– Squash can be used immediately or placed in baggies and frozen.