Tag Archives: healthy

Lunch Log, 2nd Edition

4 Apr

A few years ago, after a conversation between Sophie and her cousin Grace, we realized that when it comes to lunch, someone else’s always looks better.  To help the girls keep track of what they liked about their own lunch, and what they spied in someone else’s lunch that looked particularly tasty, we created The Lunch Log.  Like every great worksheet project, they used it for awhile until it lost its luster.  Over the past two years, we’ve pulled it out and used it occasionally, usually when the lunch whining became particularly strong.

Recently, we’ve been talking about tracking food again, but this time for a different purpose.  For quite some time, Sophie has had stomachaches, and we can’t quite figure out what is causing her trouble.  We’ve tried adding more of certain foods into her diet, cut back on other things, and encouraged her to drink lots of water.  Some days are definitely better than others, but we’re not seeing consistent results.  In conversations with friends, I know that there are lots of families who are having similar experiences.  It’s easy to spot the connection between what you eat and how you feel, but identifying foods that are causing trouble takes some time and diligence.  It is a slow and tedious process.

Fact: There may be a direct connection between stomachache reduction and worksheet completion.*

*Totally not a fact.

While no worksheet has been scientifically proven to cure stomachaches, tracking what you eat and noting how you feel after doing so can certainly help to make the connections between food and the way your body feels.  By writing it all down, we’re reducing some of the mystery and giving us the tools we’ll need to pay attention and find patterns.

Tracking is easy – simply complete the worksheet after each meal.  If your child is a pretty good reader and writer, let them do the writing and add details as needed.  At the end of the day, use the Recap section as a way to identify whether there was enough variety in the foods consumed to provide the nutrients needed for wellness and growth.  Overall, the goal is to create an awareness between what you eat and how you feel, so don’t worry too much about 100% accuracy.  Unless 100% accuracy is very important to you, in which case I apologize that I’m using LUNCH to represent ALL FOOD CONSUMED REGARDLESS OF THE TIME OF DAY.

lunch log_diagram_v2_Page_2

Items you will need:
• Mini binder (holds 5.5” x 8.5” sized pages)
• Adjustable 3-hole punch or hand-held paper punch
• Scissors or paper cutter
• Pencil
• Colored pencils, markers, or crayons
• Printed cover and inside pages (see links below)

Print it:
Lunch Log, 2nd Edition – Lunch Log Cover, Instructions, Inside Pages
Lunch Log, 2nd Edition – Inside Pages Only

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Bean and Bacon Soup

26 Oct

Over the years I have purchased a wide assortment of dried beans.  Each time I’ve used whatever I needed for a specific recipe, closed up the bag, and stacked it in the cupboard.  Now, after several years, I don’t just have “some beans” in the cupboard, I have a BEAN CUPBOARD.

Some people collect Precious Moments, and I collect dried beans.  And still, I win.

Dried beans are a great thing to have on hand, but using them requires a bit of planning.  My favorite way to prep beans is to brine them.  It just couldn’t be easier and consistently produces a tender and well-seasoned bean.  Brining beans works basically like this: mix water and salt, add beans, let sit for good while, rinse, then cook.  Done.  And that’s exactly what I did when making this soup.  In the morning I brined the beans and by the time I was ready to make the soup for dinner they were ready to go.

This soup is very hearty, flavorful, and tasty.  It is stick-to-your-ribs thick, so feel free to add more stock or water to bring it to the consistency that you like.  If you save it and reheat it, you’ll definitely want to add more water.  Between the brining and the bacon, this is a fairly salty soup so be sure to give it a check before adding any more at the end.  And although it doesn’t fit my official criteria for a low-calorie item, it comes in awfully close at 309 calories/serving.  Plus, there’s bacon in it.

Make some; it’s delicious.

Bean and Bacon Soup
Serves: 5

4 c. water
1/4 c. Kosher salt
1 c. dried pinto beans
1 c. dried cannellini beans
2 strips pepper bacon
1/2 onion, diced
1 clove garlic, minced
5 c. chicken stock
1 c. carrots, sliced

 

In a large bowl, stir together water and salt until salt is dissolved.  Add dried beans, and let sit at least 4 hours up to overnight.  After soaking, remove beans from brine and rinse.  Set aside.

In a dutch oven, cook bacon over medium heat until crispy.  Remove and set aside.  Add onion and garlic, reduce heat to medium-low and cook about 5 minutes or until it is golden in color.  Slowly add stock, scraping up the browned bits from the bottom.  Increase heat, add beans, and bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to a simmer, cover, and cook for 60 minutes or until the beans are tender.

Using a potato masher, mash some beans to help thicken the soup.  Crumble the bacon and add to the soup, add carrots,  and cook covered for 15 minutes or until the carrots are tender.

 

Estimated Calories:  309 cal/serving

Print it: Bean and Bacon Soup

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary

10 Oct

As part of my end of the season bounty, I have a big pile of slowly ripening cherry tomatoes.  At the peak of the cherry tomato season, we’d easily polish off a bowl in an afternoon just as a wander-by snack.  They were delicious eaten that way, but now that it’s the end of the season, they are a little more sour and less popular.  And at this stage, the time between “almost ripe” and “super ripe” is pretty short.  So, to boost the sweetness and encourage consumption, I decided to roast the tomatoes with a few of our favorite things and serve it up as a side.  And. It. Was. Awesome.

Unless you are my son, who says that the smell of rosemary can ruin a life.  And of course, he is wrong.

This dish could not be easier.  Cut up a bunch of stuff, throw it in a covered casserole, put it in the oven, stir and serve.  It would be excellent served with pork, chicken, turkey, or wild game.  It is very versatile and packed with flavor.  If you were cooking for a crowd, it would be easy to double – just increase the cooking time until the potatoes are tender.  So easy, so delicious.  You should make some.

Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary
Serves: 6

 

1 lb. red potatoes, cut into big chunks
½ lb. cherry tomatoes, halved
1 shallot, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 T. olive oil
1 t. rosemary, minced
Kosher salt and Freshly ground black pepper
½ c. kalamata olives, halved

 

Preheat oven to 350° F.

In a casserole dish combine potatoes through rosemary and season with salt and pepper.  Cover and bake for 50 minutes.  Remove from oven, stir in kalamata olives and set aside for 5-10 minutes.  Season with salt and pepper if needed, and serve.

 

Estimated Calories:  123 cal/serving

Print it:  Roasted Potatoes and Tomatoes with Kalamata and Rosemary

 

Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup

7 Sep

Cooler days and school back in session means that the crockpot has returned to it’s semi-permanent position on my kitchen countertop.  Hungry for some flavorful, slow-cooked food and eager to have food ready with little effort, I started searching around for some new recipes to try in the crockpot.  I spotted a Tomato Basil Parmesan Soup on Pinterest that looked mighty tasty, the only problem of course, all that dairy.  Looking through the ingredients, I figured that it wouldn’t be very hard to substitute the dairy for non-dairy counterparts, and while I was at it I decided to reduce the calories from the original version.  With all new recipes, it feels like a real crapshoot whether anyone will eat it, let alone enjoy it.

This recipe?  Jackpot.  Jackpot in the Crockpot.

Creamy and slightly cheesy, the base of this soup tastes a tiny bit like the sauce in Chef Boyardee’s canned pasta, which normally would not make it a ringing endorsement in my book.  HOWEVER, the kids totally loved it.  And the more I had, the more I loved it too.  Slightly rich, hearty, and low in calories, this soup might be one of our new favorite things.

After replacing the dairy ingredients in the original recipe (butter, parmesan, half and half) with non-dairy counter parts (non-dairy butter, Daiya mozzarella, soy cream), I was worried that the resulting soup would not be thick and creamy enough.  To make sure that the soup was not too thin, I added ingredients in two batches, pureeing the first half to create a thicker base.  The resulting flavor and texture was terrific, helped to thicken up the soup, and allowed me to reduce some of the fat and calorie-laden ingredients (this recipe is about 35% lower in calories than the original).  This recipe makes a pretty big batch of soup, which worked out great here because it has been requested for dinner and lunch several times.  I’m not sure if it will freeze well, and this time, I won’t even have the chance to try.

Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup
Serving size: 1 c.
Serves: 11

2 (14 oz) cans diced tomatoes, divided
1-1/2 c. carrots, cut into bite-sized bits, divided
1 stalk celery, cut into chunks
1/4 c. onion, cut into big chunks
1 clove garlic
1/4 c. fresh herbs (mix of basil and oregano)
4 c. chicken broth
2 T. non-dairy margarine
1/4 c. flour
1 c. soy cream
1 can cannellini beans, drained and rinsed
3/4 c. Daiya mozzerella
Salt and pepper to taste

Add one can tomatoes, half the carrots, celery, onion, garlic, herbs, and chicken broth to a crockpot.  Cook on low for 5 hours.  After 5 hours, use a hand blender to puree the soup until no chunks remain.

In a skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter.  Add flour and cook for about 5 minutes.  Add cream and stir until the flour mixture breaks up into the liquid and becomes a thick sauce.  Add 1 c. of soup from the crockpot, stirring until well-combined.  Add another cup of soup from the crockpot if any doughy chunks remain.  When everything has been combined and the sauce has thickened, add to the crockpot and stir.  Add remaining tomatoes, carrots, cannellini beans, and mozzerella, then stir to combine.  Cover and cook for an additional hour.

Serve.

 

Estimated calories:  143 cal/serving

Print it: Creamy Italian Crockpot Soup

Notes:
– If you would like to replace my non-dairy replacements with dairy versions, I’d recommend using butter, shredded part-skim mozzerella, and half and half in the same amounts noted here.

Flatbread with Cauliflower, Rosemary, Kalamata, and Goat Cheese

6 Aug

Last week all I could think about was the Garlic Mashed Potato Pizza from Pizza Luce.  Like an earworm, I knew it would stick there until I did something about it.  I had two options: 1) Drive 90 miles to get some, 2) Make it.  I decided to make it.  All I needed was crust, garlic mashed potatoes, tomatoes, green onions, and tomatoes.  Of those ingredients, I had none, so I had to make do with what I had.

And it is not a real hardship to make do with what you have, when what you have is some goat cheese.

I started out with a pita flatbread.  You can use any variety or size, the one I like is not too dry and around 190 calories.  You can use whatever kind you like, just make sure it is strong enough to hold a big pile of ingredients.  Next, I swapped out garlic mashed potatoes for some pureed cauliflower with garlic.  The consistency is different than mashed potatoes, but not by a whole lot.  Plus, cauliflower is high in calcium, and one serving (2 slices) of this flatbread provides half of the amount of calcium you should consume in a day!  I added a bit of olive oil and goat cheese to the cauliflower mixture to make it taste a little creamier, then mixed in chopped rosemary to give it great flavor.  It looked a little bland, so I threw a few kalamata on the top, and added some extra goat cheese.  If you wanted to cut back on some of the calories, you could leave off the last bit of goat cheese, but it only saves you about 40 calories, and I think its worth it.

This dish would make an excellent starter, would pair well with a salad or bowl of soup, and makes an excellent dinner.  Even if you ate the whole thing all at once, not that I would know (I would totally know).

Flatbread with Cauliflower, Rosemary, Kalamata, & Goat Cheese
Serving size: 2 pieces
Serves: 2

 

8” flatbread pita
1 c. cauliflower florets
1 clove garlic
2 t. olive oil, divided
2 oz. goat cheese, divided
1 t. fresh rosemary
3 kalamata olives, halved
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a microwave safe bowl, add cauliflower and garlic, cover with water and microwave for 4 minutes.  Drain, and place cauliflower and garlic in a food processor.  Add half of the olive oil, and pulse until mostly smooth.  Remove from food processor, and mash in half of the goat cheese and all of the rosemary.  Add a little salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Place the flatbread on a cookie sheet and top with the cauliflower mixture, spreading it out to cover.  Top pizza with the olives and the rest of the goat cheese.  Bake in the oven for about 12 minutes or until the goat cheese just starts to brown.

Remove from the oven and cut into quarters.  Drizzle with remaining olive oil and add salt and pepper to taste.  Serve.

 

Estimated calories:  484 cal/serving

Print it: Flatbread with Cauliflower, Rosemary, Kalamata, and Goat Cheese

Lamb Meatballs with Herbvocado Sauce

2 Aug

I LOVE lamb and am lucky enough to have a pretty good supply of it in my freezer.  Right now, I have quite a few packages of ground lamb and they are practically burning a hole in my apron pocket.  Last week, I gave lamb burgers a try.  While I found the flavor delicious, they did not hold a nice flat patty shape, and instead puffed up like giant meatballs.  They were tasty, but a little hard to eat.  So this week when I decided to give it another go, I thought dude, why fight it.

Let them be meatballs.

This recipe is super easy, takes just a few minutes of prep, and only a few more to cook.  I served the meatballs with a some sides – pita bread, tomatoes, cucumbers, and kalamata olives – and a healthy serving of Herbvocado Sauce.  The meatballs make a tasty dinner but would also be great to serve as appetizers.  Everybody loves meatballs!  Well, not my kids, but that might have more to do with the MEATBALL OVERDOSE OF 2007 more than anything else.

Lamb Meatballs with Herbvocado Sauce
Serving size: 5 or 6 meatballs + 1/4 c. sauce
Serves: 6

MEATBALLS
1 lb. ground lamb
1 clove garlic, finely minced
2 T. fresh herbs, finely chopped (mixture of mint, oregano, parsley)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

SAUCE
6 oz. nonfat Greek yogurt
1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and cut into chunks
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 T. light mayo
1 T. lemon juice
2 T. fresh herbs, finely chopped (mixture of mint, oregano, parsley)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a bowl combine together ground lamb, garlic, herbs, salt and pepper, until the herbs and garlic are evenly distributed.  Form meatballs about the size of a small superball (little bigger than a quarter in diameter).  This should make about 30-32 meatballs at this size.

Over medium heat, place meatballs in a large skillet and partially cover.  Cook for about 5 minutes and turn.  Reduce the heat to medium low and cook for an additional 5 minutes, then turn.  Cook for another 1-3 minutes until the meatballs are cooked all the way through.  Take care not to overcook or they will get a bit dry.

Remove the meatballs from the skillet and set on a paper towel covered plate to soak up some of the grease.

While the meatballs are cooking, make the sauce.  In a food processor add avocado, garlic, mayo, and lemon juice.  Pulse until starting to blend together.  Add Greek yogurt and pulse until smooth.  Remove from food processor and add herbs, stirring until well mixed.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

Serve meatballs with a side of sauce.

Estimated calories:  204 cal/serving

Print it: Lamb Meatballs with Herbvocado Sauce

Herbvocado Sauce

1 Aug

In the past few years, Greek yogurt has gone from relatively unknown to everybody’s food BFF.  It’s in EVERYTHING.  And while I like the way it tastes with a little fruit and honey, I find it to be way too sour for my taste to eat it plain.  Even when used in place of sour cream in recipes, it still seems a too sour.  BUT, it is so packed with protein and low in calories that I keep trying to find ways to work it into my diet.  And you know what makes everything better?  No, this time the answer is not bacon, but bacon’s championship counterpart THE AVOCADO.

Creamy and fat tasting, an avocado proved to be just what the Greek yogurt needed to help counter the sourness.  With a garden-load of fresh herbs staring me in the face, I decided to throw some in to add flavor and texture to the sauce.  The result is a thick, flavorful, healthy, protein-packed dip.  Describing it to my son, he said that Greek Yogurt Sauce with Avocado and Fresh Herbs would take so long to say that no one would want to eat it.  He said that if it were him, he’d give it a better name.

Herbs + Avocado = Herbvocado. Kid named, mom approved.

So far, I’ve used this sauce as a dip for vegetables, meatballs, and to top a burger.  It would be great used in place of ranch or blue cheese and served with hot wings.  Add a little water to the dip to thin it out and it would make an excellent salad dressing or a sauce drizzled over grilled vegetables.  It is versatile, light, and delicious.

Herbvocado Sauce
Serving size: 1/4 c.
Serves: 6

6 oz. nonfat Greek yogurt
1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and cut into chunks
1 clove garlic, chopped
1 T. light mayo
1 T. lemon juice
2 T. fresh herbs, finely chopped (mixture of mint, oregano, parsley)
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a food processor add avocado, garlic, mayo, and lemon juice. Pulse until starting to blend together. Add Greek yogurt and pulse until smooth. Remove from food processor and add herbs, stirring until well mixed. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Estimated calories: 62 cal/serving

Print it:  Herbvocado Sauce

Notes:
– The amount that this recipe makes will vary slightly based on the size of the avocado.
– Each 1/4 c. serving of this dip contains around 3.5 g of protein.  That’s as much as half an egg a 1/4 c. of cooked beans!  For dip!

SlimKicker GIVEAWAY: Win a Kitchen Scale!

27 Jul

For many years, I’ve known that the easiest way for me to stay at my healthiest is by tracking what I eat.  For a long time it was in a journal, then a spreadsheet, and in the past year or so I’ve relied on sites and apps to do the tracking.  By far, using phone apps has been the easiest way to track since I always have it on hand.

I’ve recently tried a new app by SlimKicker that I really like.  SlimKicker is a diet tracker and game that turns diet and fitness goals into a level-up game with points, rewards and challenges. You level up by tracking healthy calories and exercises, and completing challenges such as quitting soda for a week.  The thing I like the best about it is the way in which it provides nutritional information.  I have not found an easier way to determine whether I’m eating the right amounts of protein, calroies, carbs, fat, and fiber.  If you have an iPhone, I’d highly recommend this free app (or by their site if you do not use an iPhone).

And now that we’re on the topic of FREE, SlimKicker has generously offered to give away an Ozeri Touch Digital Kitchen Scale to one lucky Calamity Jennie reader who comes up with the best new challenge idea.

Here’s how it works:

1. Leave a comment on this entry with your challenge idea.
2. Each challenge duration should be at least a week long and no longer than a month.
3. Challenges can be geared toward fitness, food, or overall wellness.
4. Try to keep your challenges simple to understand and capture the idea in 1-2 sentences.
5. You may add up two entries.  Enter each as its own comment.

Rules: SlimKicker will select their favorite idea and use it on their site.  A winner will be selected on Friday, August 3, 2012.  This contest is open to U.S. Residents only.

Need some examples?  Here are a few from SlimKicker’s Recommended list:
– No snacks after dinner for a week
– Replace soda with water for the next 7 days
– Move during commercials when you’re watching TV this week

****

WINNER!  SlimKicker likes your suggestion, Carrie!  So much so, they are excited to give you a kitchen scale. Enjoy using it to weigh your vegetables.

“My challenge idea is to eat 5 servings of vegetables a day. When I do this, I don’t have room left over for un-healthy stuff!”

Great idea, Carrie!

Healthy Summer Challenge

12 Jun

As an adult, the connection between food (what and how much) and exercise (how much and how often) and how I feel is something that I can clearly see.  The more I eat and the less I move, the worse I feel.  Sometimes those feelings are physical like an upset stomach or discomfort in clothing that does not fit as well as it used to.  Other times, those feelings come in the form about how I feel about myself.  It seems like common sense that by eating the right amounts of good foods and exercising regularly, you are giving yourself the best possible chances for feeling healthy, strong, and comfortable in your own body.  And while it is common sense, it doesn’t always come easily and it rarely happens without thought and effort.

As a parent, I struggle with how to talk to my kids about health and nutrition in a way that is both age appropriate and positive.  We started last year by using the Lunch Log as a way to help illustrate the different factors that go into a making and eating a healthy meal.  In a worksheet format, the Lunch Log can help a kid to make sure they are eating something from each of the major food groups and getting some variety along the way.  In our family, tracking meals helped the kids to understand that while they like apples and it is a healthy choice, mixing up the kids of foods and vegetables that you choose helps to give your body different nutrients.  Full disclosure: they were more interested in eating something from each of the color groups so that they could use more  markers, than they were with the nutrients that those foods provided.  And you know what?  I’m okay with that.  At this age, seeking and consuming variety is a lot more important than understanding the nutritional value that each option provides.

Lately I’ve noticed that we’ve gotten into a bit of a food rut, and this led to some interesting discussion about making healthy choices.  The more we talked about health and wellness, the more I realized that two of the hardest parts about living a healthy life are AWARENESS and CONSISTENCY.  While it is not that hard to plan out a healthy lunch, it is just one part of a day that is just one part of a week and so on.  And of course, when you start to look at the big picture, the focus moves off of just food and onto the other stuff you do for yourself that helps you to feel good.

To help us to take a look at what we’re doing to help ourselves be healthy and feel good, we’re putting into action the:

Healthy Summer Challenge

And because we’re nothing if not competitive, we’re making it into a game with prizes.  Here’s how it works:

  1. Fill out a Healthy Summer Challenge Form (example below, printable page at the bottom).
  2. Write down the basic information in each category to show what you ate, what you did for exercise, and how much water you consumed.
  3. Give each category a rating from 1-10 (10 is high) to show how you think you did that day.  Making pretty good food choices for a day could give you a 8 or a 9.  Eating a bunch of junk would warrant a low number.  These ratings are subjective.
  4. Add any Notes for Tomorrow to help you to identify things you might like to do differently.  This gives each person the chance to reflect on the day and determine if there is a positive change to make for the next day.
  5. Add the date and the person’s name to the bottom, then drop it in a bucket.
  6. Once a week, draw a slip from the bucket to select a winner.
  7. The winner gets to select a prize from the Healthy Summer Challenge Prize Pack.
  8. All remaining slips stay in the bucket, earning more chances to win.
  9. One entry per person, per day.

For our Prize Pack, I selected a few things that would encourage activities, stuff they’ve been begging for, and items I knew would catch their attention.  Also, I made an effort to choose items that did not use food or inactivity as the reward (except for the Mad Libs, they are on the sedentary side).

We’re one week into the Challenge and so far, they’re doing great.  I’ve set the Prize Pack up like a display so that they can stare down the options while they decide whether or not it is worth it to fill out the form.  And once they have the form in hand, they want to make choices that will give them a higher rating.  And although I won’t tell them, my plan to get them to be more aware of their choices is working.

As the summer progresses, I anticipate that their interest in filling out the slips will wane.  As that happens, I may throw bonus options into the mix:

  1. Bonus form for the person who has the most activity in a single week
  2. Bonus form for the person who plans and makes a healthy meal
  3. Super prize, like an afternoon at the water park
  4. Double-prize award

Want to have a Challenge at your house?  Download and print the form below.  Each sheet includes four slips – print and cut the sheet into quarters.

Print it: healthy summer challenge slips

If you participate, let us know!  We’d love to hear your ideas for bonus options, prizes, and how it works at your house.

Sriracha Shrimp with Steamed Coconut Rice

21 May

There are many nights when I sit, staring out the window and wish that somebody would drop off a bag of food.  It would be exactly what I didn’t know I wanted, from a restaurant that made excellent food and was conveniently located nearby.

On those nights, while I’m waiting for my food miracle to arrive, this might be my new go-to dish.  It is super easy, delicious, and practically cooks itself while I’m staring out the window.

Sriracha Shrimp with Steamed Coconut Rice

To prepare the rice part of this dish, I used a vegetable steamer with a rice insert.  I picked up an inexpensive one at Target this winter and I LOVE it (Model: Black and Decker).  To make the coconut rice, simply mix together the uncooked rice, water, light coconut milk and veggies, then add water, cover and leave alone until the timer goes off.  THAT’S IT.  The rice has a very mild flavor, isn’t sticky, and because it was cooked in the steamer it was easy to throw a few veggies in there and save myself a little effort.  With just a few minutes of prep and 35 minutes of doing something else, the rice and veggies are ready to eat.  AWESOME.

The shrimp part of this dish is SPICY.  Depending on your tastes, you could add more (to burn your face off) or reduce it.  Take note, there’s also a lot of garlic in here, which adds to the spice and also gives you pretty potent breath.  This might be good for the nights when you are sitting home, staring out the window BY YOURSELF.

The rice part of this dish would make an excellent side for all kinds of food.  The shrimp will be far too spicy for my kids, but I’d bet the rice will be popular.

Sriracha Shrimp with Steamed Coconut Rice
Serving size: 3 oz. shrimp + 1 c. rice
Serves: 4

1 c. Texmati rice
1/2 c. diced carrots
1/2 c. frozen peas
3/4 c. water
1/2 can light coconut milk
12 oz. shrimp (tails removed)
1/4 c. onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 T. olive oil
2 T. water
1 T. Sriracha
1 T. Worcestershire
Salt and pepper to taste

In a rice steamer, add rice, carrots, peas, water, and coconut milk.  Stir to mix.  Cover and steam for 35 minutes.

Meanwhile, mix together remaining ingredients and shake or stir to coat.  Let marinate while the rice mixture is cooking.  When the rice is done, add the shrimp mixture to a skillet over medium-high heat and cook for 2-3 minutes or until the shrimp is done.

Fluff the rice, then divide between four bowls, then divide the shrimp, placing it on top of the rice.  Serve extra Sriracha on the side.

Estimated calories:  360 cal/serving

Print it: Sriracha Shrimp and Steamed Coconut Rice

Notes:

  • If you don’t have Texmati rice, Basmati or any other long grain white rice would be a good substitute.
  • I used cooked, frozen shrimp because that is what I had on hand.  Fresh would be better.